My Logitech mouse is not working perfectly lately and I have decided to replace it with a new Logitech G600 mouse. The old mouse is a Logitech G500 with symptoms of the so-called “double click problem”. In brief, the mouse responds with a double-click each time you single-click. Well, maybe not every time, but I estimate half of the clicks are regarded as double-clicks. That can be disastrous and may cost dearly when playing poker or even worse when investing in my case. It’s also quite annoying when surfing the internet, highlighting text, capturing screen shots, playing games (like building in the wrong places at SimCity) and clicking all sorts of buttons. For all these reasons I opted for a Logitech G600 replacement mouse, which won’t break the bank.

The Logitech G600 mouse can be found for 70-80 euros or 65 pounds, shipping included. Surprisingly, there isn’t significant price difference between online and retail stores. Yet, I grabbed mine from an Ebay seller that offered the Logitech mouse for 55 euros! That is even cheaper than a brand new G500, my broken Logitech mouse!

ebay-logitech-mouse-g600

I usually do a lot of research before spending my hard-earned money on anything, even for items with a price tag less than 10 dollars. In this instance though I didn’t spend much time reading reviews about the Logitech G600 or watching video reviews. Given my overall satisfaction of other Logitech products, it didn’t take much research before convincing myself to buy the specific Logitech mouse. I could have watched the following 30-minute video review, but I was too busy searching for the lowest price available.

On the other hand Logitech mouses are not perfect. They do wear out. The Logitech G5’s tracking beam that I bought in 2006 failed a couple of years ago and its replacement, G500, is experiencing the double-click issue I described above.

logitech-mouse-g500The double-click problem of the Logitech mouse is so common for this particular model, that there are many helpful posts online about how to fix your double-clicking mouse by yourself (Do-It-Yourself repair)! Of course that fix will void the warranty, so you’d better contact Logitech first before reaching for the screwdriver. Although I did open my Logitech mouse, I didn’t go through the whole process and re-assembled it, so that I can continue working until my new Logitech mouse arrives!

My previous experience with malfunctioning Logitech products was a Logitech remote control. The control’s infrared beam was dead after a year or so. I sent an email to Logitech support attaching a video back then, where I explained the problem. I held the Logitech remote control next to a random (Samsung) remote control pointing to the web camera and pressed some buttons on both devices. It was pretty obvious that the Logitech remote wasn’t transmitting anything (How To Test a Dead Remote Control using a Digital Camera). Logitech support confirmed the device’s fault and sent me a new remote without me returning the faulty one or charging me for shipping! Two thumbs up for Logitech support!

Another device that has failed is the Draytek router I recommended in the past!

Maybe I should have checked my Logitech G500 receipt before removing the screws. Logitech usually offers 3-years warranty for their mouses, so I might have got a replacement for free. Honestly I don’t remember when I bought the faulty Logitech mouse. This time however I am making sure I don’t forget when I bought my Logitech G600 mouse with this very blog post! Hopefully I won’t be linking back to this article in the next 3 years!